Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Political Economy of Fascism Syllabus

In the wake of the election of an outright racist, sexist homophobe, now seems as good a time as any to debut my Political Economy of Fascism syllabus. This course is designed to take students through the complex of political theories that were grafted together in the early 20th century to become the doctrine of fascism. After familiarizing students with the historical developments leading to fascism, the basic principles of fascist thought are explored.

Given the compelling nature of fascist anti-rationalism, students are provided critical texts to disabuse them of the rabbit holes that fascism builds to pull people in. Instructors using this syllabus are strongly encouraged not to take this lightly. As per the syllabus, students should be instructed to do secondary source readings and debrief readings before reading the primary source (fascist) texts. Please instruct students that if they do not intend to do the secondary source and debrief readings, they should not dip into the primary source texts.

You can download the syllabus as a PDF using the Dropbox link here
Syllabus

The readings are separated by week in this Dropbox folder along with a text list of readings accessible online here
Readings

Instructors feel free to use this syllabus and reading list, but please let me know in the comments below. If you would like to modify the syllabus, I would be happy to provide the source LaTeX file the syllabus was written in.

8 comments:

  1. Hi, thank you for sharing this. I can't find the list of readings/the folder as both links lead to the syllabus. Would you be able to re-share the links? Thank you! This looks immensely helpful.

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    1. Sorry, I updated it with the correct link

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  2. Thank you for sharing this! What a valuable resource!

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  3. Do you have an extended bibliography for the course? The readings look solid, I would recommend Fascism Outside Europe by Larsen as a very solid entry--but I was hoping to see *more* of a reading list personally, that would be truly valuable.

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    1. Yes, if you go to the readings folder, there is a week by week list of the readings in a .txt document

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  4. Hello, thank you for posting this. It's helping me prepare to teach a unit on fascist aesthetics (not my specialty at all) next semester. Can you tell us about how you do the debriefs and deprogramming mentioned in the syllabus?

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    1. Sure! My class is generally designed to learn *about* fascism before delving into the primary sources to compare these understandings with the historical record. However, in this intellectual pursuit of trying to understand fascism on its own terms, it can be easy to lose sight of why we shouldn't see fascism on its own terms. The debrief materials are designed to directly challenge some of the core assumptions of fascist political reasoning. I would envision this happening seminar style where students are invited to honestly speak about what they found compelling about the fascist philosophies that they were reading (about) and a space to explore how those compelling points might be wrapped up in those core fascist assumptions.

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